University of Law Unveils New Bar Course


The University of Law in October unveiled their plans to revamp the current BPTC course in a bid to bring down costs.


The University of Law currently runs the BPTC course at a cost of £18,735. The new plans, which are awaiting approval from the Bar standards Board, will see the new BPC being delivered at their London Bloomsbury, Birmingham, Bristol, Leeds, Manchester and Nottingham campuses.


The cost of the new course for study outside of London will be £11,750 and £13000 inside London, seeing reductions of up to £6000


The new ‘BPC’ course will be much more flexible and structured. It will be tailored around individual’s needs and life. The use of classrooms will be used to their full potential with more face to face interaction to enable more tutor support as well as more opportunities to teach online.


The University of Law is not the only institution to be revamping the BPTC course, the BPP are also in the process of making changes. BPP’s new course will differ slightly to the of UofLaw new course in the fact that BPP has split their course into two parts and will be taught over a total of 8 months, with the option to pause their studies after the first part has been completed. The BPP are yet to confirm their prices. However these are sure to be set at a price to be competitive against their rival UofLaw.


The Inns of Court College of Advocacy also confirmed earlier in the year that it was in talks with the BSB who have made changed to training rules in order to make becoming a Barrister more affordable and flexible. This summer the ICCA received approval of their two part course which will come at a cost of £13,000


Hopefully this is the start of a new route into the profession of becoming a Barrister at a much more affordable rate.


Written By: Victoria-Jayne Scholes LLB (Hons)









Image Credit to LittleLaw

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